Hardcore Coasteering Day Out at Sai Kung, Hong Kong

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For those who doesn’t know about coasteering, it is an adventurous sport allowing one to explore many of the hidden areas of the coastlines that are otherwise difficult to access to. It’s one of the full body workout that generally involves hiking, scrambling, bouldering and swimming.

This summer, it’s time for me to do an annual trip to Po Pin Chau area of Sai Kung, Hong Kong to pay homage to one of the best natural scenery in one of the UNESCO Global Geoparks that is located here in Hong Kong. It is an area full of volcanic geography and especially famous for the hexagonal columns of volcanic rocks.

Yes, the pictures you see are actually taken in Hong Kong. This is the REAL Hong Kong!

Our Approach to the Mok Min Cave

We got dropped off by the taxi near Pak Lap Beach, from which we hiked up to the top of the Mok Min Cave. It was a beautiful short hike and we were able to see the awesome scenery.

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First off a short hike up to the top of the Mok Min Cave in the in the intense heat
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The water was so clear, you can even see the rocks at the bottom of the sea from the top of the hill.
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Picture taken from the top of Mok Mon Cave. Check out the hexagonal volcanic column at the side of that outcrop!

 

Cooling off at the sea

Once we scrambled down the rock face on the outside of the cave, we started out coasteering section of our trip. It was always exciting to take on challenges head on. We entered the cave and had a swim. What a nice relief from the searing heat!

We had some play around in the sea before heading off for our swim to the other side of the bay.

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Mok Mon Cave is a sea cave where there is an entrance on both sides. 
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Mok Min Cave from at the sea level!
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Our swim from Mok Min Cave to the other side of the bay. Check out those sea urchins on the rocks. Could have got some of those yummy things for our sashimi lunch!
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 This was one of our open water swims. Carrying a rucksack while you swim is much harder than you think, especially with the drag that it creates. 

 

Leaving Mok Min Cave

After we left Mok Min Cave, we walked along the coast for a bit. But since it was low tide that day, people felt that it would be interesting to swim along the coast to explore some of the geography.

In fact, we did way more swimming than what we did last year. This is the beauty of coasteering. Every time you revisit the same places, you can end up doing completely different things seeing different things depending on the tide and the weather conditions.

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We were walking along the coast, but the water looked very inviting.
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So we end up jumping into the sea. Hell yeah!

After doing a lot swimming, I was certainly getting worn out. I had to break through the physical pain barrier to get to the other side of the bay.

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More mid-swim action shots with my GoPro Camera

 

Getting to Po Pin Chau – The End Was In Sight

Despite getting tired and worn out, it was a beautiful sight to see Po Pin Chau. This rocky island is one of the most famous sights in the area. Personally, I think swimming in the channel is the best things to do, especially seeing the sea urchins chilling out on the rocks on both side of the channel.

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This is one of the most the most famous outcrop in the area
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Swimming in the channel and chillexing at the same time.

 

Afterthoughts

Certainly, this is not a hike for a beginner and of course not without risk. But if you are experienced, I would highly recommend you to do this and explore the part of Hong Kong that not many people can see. We were so privileged to be there and explore what this lovely countryside had to offer.

 

Trip Details:

  • How to get there: From Sai Kung Town Centre, take a taxi and ask the driver to drop you at Pak Lap Village. You will not be able to get there with your own car as only taxi and cars with special permits are able to access the road. You will be turn back by the people at the gatehouse if you try.
  • Distance: About 3-4 km max, but the fact that you will be swimming and exploring the caves means that it is likely for people to take 4-6 hours to complete.
  • Words of warning: Coasteering is not a risk-free activity. You need to be wary of the tide and the current. This is especially true when you are near the rocks.

 

Have you done a coasteering trio before in Hong Kong or elsewhere? What was your experience? Or are you tempted to try out coasteering? Let us know your thought in the comment section! 

 

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29 Comments Add yours

  1. That is impressive, and I bet the water felt good after all the hiking. Why kind of footwear works best for coasteering?

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    1. yhpchung says:

      It was certainly nice to cool off in the brutal heat. As for shoes I personally have a pair of Columbia Drainmaker. They are nice because of the built-in holes in the soles that will allow water to drain out. Other people have five-ten shoes. I guess one has to try out a few.

      Anyway you are welcome to join me on the next coasteering trip when you’re in HK. xD

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Jure Snoj says:

    Well I guess there’s a first for everything… I’ve never heard of “coasteering” before, but it looks like a cool activity. Should give it a try one day.

    Like

    1. yhpchung says:

      It’s one of those sports that most people wouldn’t have heard of. I didn’t until a couple of years ago when my friends invited me for the first one. Never regretted trying. 🙂

      Like

  3. Gareth says:

    I must admit, I had never heard of coasteering before reading this but it certainly does seem like a great way to explore a place. Not quite sure I’d be fit enough for it at the minute but somewhere such as Sai Kung does act as motivation. I must say, I am intrigued and might give it a shot before too long!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. yhpchung says:

      It’s one of the niche sports that not many people have heard of, but it’s definitely a good way to explore off the beaten trail. There was a guy who got an interview with South China Morning Post a while back and he did capture the spirit of it.

      http://m.scmp.com/video/lifestyle/2023951/coasteering-hong-kong

      Like

  4. When the water starts to freeze to ice and the snow starts to fall, then pictures like these really makes me jealous. These pictures really look stunning. Thank you as well for the introduction to coasteering, would be fun to try one day. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. yhpchung says:

      It’s always great to try new things. I glad I did when my friends invited me for the first one.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Although I was aware of the activity you have described I wasn’t aware that it had a name. Coasteering sounds really wonderful and a way to explore the unexplored. And it’s a true adventure activity with full on risks unlike so many others. Loved the post and the video/photos.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Indrani says:

    Coasteering concept is new to me. Interesting to read how you did it. The pictures are truly great, such clarity through sea water is indeed rare.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Kevin Wagar says:

    I’ve never heard of coasteering before. It looks like an amazing way to explore less accessible places while having an full-on adventure in the process

    Liked by 1 person

  8. asoulwindow says:

    I loved the video. It makes me want to jump in and join the fun. I am an adventure freak myself and love participating in such outdoor activities. The Mok Mon cave looks really cool. Hong Kong is mostly perceived as a city destination. I will keep this place in mind when I visit there.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Wow, I must admit, I’m a little jealous. That water is gorgeous, I just want to jump in. And the Mok Mon cave would be so much fun to explore. Hong Kong has been on my list for ages, I’d better get packing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. yhpchung says:

      Haha, water was cool and inviting, at least in the brutally hot summer days. Do come to HK, there are lots to offer here.

      Like

  10. emmaeatsandexplores says:

    This looks amazing! I’ve never heard of coasteering before but I’m off to Hong Kong in Feb so I’m pinning this to read when I’m planning my trip!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. yhpchung says:

      Enjoy your trip. HK has a lot more countryside than most people think.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. TravelPeppy says:

    Amazing, we are traveling to Hong Kong next month. Your post is something we will look to inspiration

    Liked by 1 person

    1. yhpchung says:

      Thank you. I’m glad you enjoy our blog. It’s the best time of the year to visit HK with the weather being cooler. Enjoy your holiday. 🙂

      Like

  12. Never heard of Coasteering. Sounds intense and something I would love to do given I’m reasonably fit. I could imagine spending the day swimming from one end of the other. Hong Kong is certainly different from the high rise building and the modern city most people know of. This is exactly what I would go and do if I were to visit Hong Kong someday. Thanks for sharing this with the world. What an adventure!

    Like

  13. sudiptode says:

    Really love your blog and the pictures that you have clicked especially of sea through the rock formations. What would say is a good time to visit here? Did you try some of Hong Kong’s food??

    Liked by 1 person

    1. yhpchung says:

      Thank you 🙂 The rocks are volcanic formations. Apparently there were lots of volcanoes billions of years ago. So it is an interesting place to explore.

      We live in HK, so we have access to great variety of food, like dim sum etc. We always go out after an adventurous trip this. 🙂

      Like

  14. I can’t believe I’ve never heard of this comprehensive activity! It sounds like a blast to explore new coastlines. I can’t believe this is Hong Kong from the pics!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Lindon Lee says:

    At first I thought Coasteering is just the same thing with Canyoneering. Like that you added video I really enjoyed it, maybe I should learn to swim first before giving this Coasteering thing a try. Thanks for this new concept!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. travellingslacker says:

    I din’t know there is a term like coasteering although I would surely lke to do it. Although good to see so many other aspects of Hong Kong. Because in my mind it is just a big, crowded metropolis.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. NextStopAbroad.com says:

    Inspiring! I have never heard of coasteering until this moment. And my limited “knowledge” of Hong Kong covered “high buildings and busy city” topics. From your images, HK looks like a place worth discovering even for a nature-addicted person like me. 🙂 Thanks for sharing

    Liked by 1 person

    1. yhpchung says:

      Many people think HK is covered in skyscraper, but in fact there are a lot of countryside and many of them are beautiful national parks. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Brown Gal Trekker says:

    I have been to HongKong but never heard o this place. Learned something new. Adding to my list next time I’m in HK. Thanks

    Liked by 1 person

    1. yhpchung says:

      Yes, it’s definitely a place that I would recommend.

      Like

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